Jan
20

Rex Ryan And Players Talk To The Media

posted by: Site Admin | Jets Playoffs | 0 comments

Rex Ryan And Players Talk To The Media

On Wednesday head coach Rex Ryan, QB Mark Sanchez, WR Santonio Holmes and CB Darrelle Revis spoke to the media about the AFC Championship Game against the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Head Coach Rex Ryan

Opening statement…
Here's the injuries: Jason Taylor did not practice today with a concussion. He's been cleared though. I expect he'll practice tomorrow, and obviously he's going to play on Sunday. He finished the game, so it's just something like he had some signs of a concussion later that night so we're just being, however you want to say it, cautious or whatever. But he has passed the test, so he's ready to roll.

Guys that were limited today: Drew Coleman with a knee; Darrelle Revis, hamstring; James Ihedigbo, knee‑ankle; Brad Smith, groin. All of those guys are limited. Guys that were full: (Antonio) Cromartie, groin; Mike DeVito, neck; Santonio Holmes, quad; Nick Mangold, shoulder; Sione (Pouha), back; and (Mark) Sanchez, right shoulder. So that's the injuries.

This week, it's weird. I'm not going to tell a lie. This is exciting to be here again in this position. It feels a little different though this year than it did last year. I think the reason for it is I think we're the only ones who really believed in each other last year. There are more people that realize the Jets are a good football team, and I think the expectations are extremely high, not just by us in this organization and our building, but people obviously around the country that know the Jets are an excellent football team, so that feels a little different.

The fact we're playing against the Pittsburgh Steelers with about as rich of history as there is in this league, as far as having Super Bowl success, playing them at Pittsburgh, we know it's going to be a huge challenge for us. There's no doubt. But this is, we've called it before, a triple chinstrap game, a straight-ahead, no fair dodging game. Both teams are built the same. It's going to be one heck of a game to watch. All I want to do is find a way to win, by one point, whatever. We want to be a part of that. I want that green and white confetti coming down. We want to hold the trophy, the Lamar Hunt Trophy. We want that to be ours. We want the hat, we want the T‑shirts. We want to experience that. We know it's going to be one heck of a battle. We understand that. But that's our mission. That's what we want to accomplish. With that, I'll open it up for questions.

On how facing Pittsburgh recently affects the game plan…
I think you're definitely going to go back and look at that game. You're going to look at the game they just played against the Ravens and Cleveland. You'll go back and look at all those games. But the preparation, you're going to have instead of a five‑game break down, which you normally would have, maybe now you have a 10‑game break down. You want to see if they're still doing the same thing. Quite honestly, when you see the Pittsburgh Steelers, they're not going to change a whole lot. They are who they are. They're about as multiple as it gets on defense and the way they attack you with an outstanding group of pass rushers. They know how to play the game. They get after people. Offensively, they can run the football. They ran it on us. They made some big plays in the passing game on us. I think the challenge for them is, it's kind of weird, sometimes they'll play three tight ends on you, sometimes they'll go to five receivers on you, so you get a little bit of everything from Pittsburgh offensively. Anyway, we know them, they know us, and we know this is going to be a heck of a football game.

On what he admires about the Pittsburgh Steelers…
I look at it as the way football's meant to be played. This is two hard‑hitting, hard‑nosed teams, getting ready to go at it. Just roll the clock back about 30 years or something, that’s the kind of game it's going to be. That's who we are, and that's who Pittsburgh is, and that's who Pittsburgh has always been, so that I respect. I respect the way they play. Quite honestly, though, it doesn't matter if my dad was coaching that team or my son was playing on that team, it's on, and we know it.

On whether he’s concerned about a potential let-down after an emotional game at New England…
No. Shoot, the Super Bowl's not played for another three weeks or something. We plan on being there, and to do that, it's going to take everything we have to have a chance at it. You thought last week was emotional and all that, just wait until this week. We've both had had some huge wins against some outstanding opponents. But we know what this one is all about. It's going to take everything. Both teams will be committed to the same thing. Both teams want to get to that Super Bowl and have that opportunity. Both teams want to be AFC Champions and represent our conference in the Super Bowl. So, a letdown emotionally, I don't think that's even possible this week.

On how important it was to change the team’s mentality when he arrived last year…
I never realized the ‘same old Jets’ mentality because I remember Super Bowl III and things like that, some of the successes that when my dad was here that the Jets had. Everybody else told me about the ‘same old Jets’ mentality and all that. That's why, ‘same old Jets’ mentality, the two years I've been here, back‑to‑back to the AFC Championship game. So we'll take the ‘same old Jets’ mentality next year, too. We'll sign up for this exact spot. That would be fine with us, and have those opportunities.

Again, I never tried to change a culture or change this or change that. I was just going to be who I was, surround myself with like‑minded people; a coaching staff that cared about their players, that had a great passion for the game of football, and that's what I was looking for in building a staff. We did that. I got as good a staff as there is in this league – tremendous coaches. I've always said that these guys don't work for me, they work with me and we’re a team. When you look at the type of players we have, they had an outstanding nucleus of talent here and we tried to bring in that same energy, that kind of passion, that kind of teammate to just add with that. If I thought there was any flaw about somebody else, maybe, from a character standpoint as far as what kind of leader they were as a teammate and all that type of stuff, we just moved on. Not saying they can't play in the NFL; they just couldn't play for us. I wanted guys that are great teammates, that care about each other, that are committed to winning and committing to building each other up. And that's what we have. We have a whole team of those right now.

Mike Tannenbaum has done an outstanding job. You look at our roster, about half the roster has been turned over in those two years. I think that's a real tribute to Mike Tannenbaum and his guys up there trying to bring in the right kind of players. We don't make moves just to stay the same or make moves just to be selling newspapers or something. The moves that we made went to better our football team. The commitment we have as an organization is to win the Super Bowl. That's the only goal we have, and that's what we’ve tried to do. Some of the moves we did might have been looked at through some people's eyes as, ‘Oh, they're this and that.’ Well, no. Our only purpose of making the moves we made in the off‑season was to better our chances of winning a Super Bowl. And I think now you see some of those moves really paying off for us.

On whether the Jets face the toughest road ever to reach the Super Bowl…
Well, I can say this, it's not easy. I can tell you that much (laughing). I don't know who’s next; (Terry) Bradshaw? I'm not sure. But that's a lot of Super Bowls and those are three outstanding organizations. Clearly, we have a ton of work to do to pull this off. But we think we're the men for the job and we're going to find out Sunday.

On whether the team feels added pressure due to higher public expectations this season…
Well, I don't think you can get higher expectations than we have in our locker room. There's all this ‘You're going to have to deliver,’ and all this talk. All I said is what I thought was the truth. When I look back to President Obama, which I was today looking back, it's because I believe it. Added pressure, it's not pressure; it's an opportunity for us. We don't look at it as pressure. We look at it as an opportunity to accomplish a goal that we set out to do.

On the challenge that Pittsburgh QB Ben Roethlisberger presents…
They've got an outstanding set offense, but they do as good a job as anybody in this league when it breaks down. First off, Roethlisberger being able to just knock people around physically, not go down, keep plays alive with his athleticism, with his strength and all that. But the receivers do a great job. They run their route and then they see Big Ben scrambling and they get open. They'll come back to the ball like most people do, but then they stay active. It's not just the set thing if you're high, come back; if you're across the ball, keep going, all those type of things. They get open and they do an outstanding job of that. Ben is poised, and he makes throws down the field.

On what he expects from WR Santonio Holmes as he faces his former team…
I expect him to have the same approach that everybody else has, that all of his teammates have, and that is to give everything he has in preparation, on the practice field, in the classroom and all of that; and then to have that excitement and that energy on the field when we kick it off for real. That is the way all his teammates are going to be as well. Is it added excitement to him? I don't know if there possibly could be added energy or excitement or anything else. We're playing for the AFC Championship, so it's going to be great. But one of the reasons we brought Tone here is for these kind of games. Big‑time players make big‑time plays in the brightest spotlight, and here it is right here. The AFC Championship time, this is Tone time.

On his reaction when he found out Holmes was available via trade…
I just wanted him. I never cared about the compensation. Let (Mike) Tannenbaum figure that out. I just knew that anybody that beat me that bad, that I’d just as soon have him on our team. Three games in a row when I was in Baltimore, he beat us. I think they might have scored one offensive touchdown, and he scored every one of them. So he's that kind of player. You think you've got him batted down, and all of a sudden, boom, there he goes. I think all you need to see of what kind of competitor he is, as I'm sure everybody had the same feeling I did, was you remember that Super Bowl and how when the game was on the line, he was begging his teammates to give him a chance, to give him the football. It's kind of like a guy, ‘Hit the ball to me.’ That's Santonio Holmes.

On whether he will have CB Darrelle Revis cover one receiver at Pittsburgh this Sunday…
Well, we'll be multiple with what we do with Darrelle, but there's only one of him. If we had more, that would be great. I'd sign up for that. But he's the best in the business. Regardless of who we put him on, that's probably not a good thing for that person. So the Steelers have a great receiving corps with Hines Ward and with (Mike) Wallace. That kid's about as good a vertical receiver as there is in the game right now. So who do you put him on? I'll say this, we're not going to line him up on (Chris) Kemoeatu. We'll make sure of that.

On the Jets being claimed by public figures in both New York and New Jersey…
Well, there's enough of the Jets to go around (laughing). We're happy to be the New Jersey Jets, New York Jets. This is our whole area, and before too long, hopefully we'll be the type of team that the whole country wants to embrace.

On the last time he can remember Revis being beaten by a wide receiver…
No, I really can't. We give him the toughest down. It's not like he's just playing corner. A lot of times, we'll give him the toughest down. You have no help. So that offense knows you have no help. A lot of times we'll just take a shot over there because we want you to. We have as good a chance of catching that football as you do. I've only seen it one other time in my life and that was with Deion Sanders. Those are the two that I can remember. There's been a lot of great corners in this league, but those are the only two guys that I can think of that will be put in as poor a situation as you can put a guy in, we do that with Darrelle. I'm sure he's happy that he's a Jet.

On QB Mark Sanchez’s postseason success over the last two years…
It's something I'm aware of. But again, he doesn't know the difference; he's just playing. But he's got such a grasp of our system now. He knows how to study film. He knows how to study opponents. He's totally committed. He gets excited, as great competitors do. A lot of times, a guy can think he's a good competitor, but when you get on the biggest stage, not so much. Mark’s just the opposite. He's such a huge competitor, but the bigger the stage, the more he wants to play and the more he looks into it as this is his time to shine. That's just the way Mark is.

QB Mark Sanchez

On his confidence in being a leader and how much of it came from his father…
Wow. I think part of it you're born with and you learn from other people, from my older brothers, from my dad, from my mom. From my dad's side, him being a firefighter, it's very similar to being a quarterback because he has his own group, his team, and they rely on each other. They count on each other and they need to be accountable to each other with their lives. While our trade isn't quite (risking) our lives, it's wins and losses and that can change people's careers, so it's important to us. Then for my mom, her idea of leadership was serving others first and being that kind of leader. There (are) different types (of leaders). There are guys who can speak up and guys who can lead by example. I try to mix in a little bit of both. They've taught me to be competitive and taught me to lead from an early age, so that's kind of where it came from. It just seems natural here. You're the quarterback of a multi‑million dollar franchise. You're the face, you're the guy, and you need to wear it and own it and be it at all times, whether you're at the podium or at home studying your plays or you're out with the guys. You've got to make the right decisions for the team and talk the right way and love those guys around you. I guess that's where it started, but it makes my job so easy here when you have guys like Nick Mangold to help you (and) when you have perennial Pro Bowlers and future Hall of Famers like LT (LaDainian Tomlinson) to help you. It's a joy to do it here.

On how reassuring it is to have a veteran wide receiver like Jerricho Cotchery…
All three of them (Cotchery, Braylon Edwards and Santonio Holmes) and Dustin's (Keller) learning so much too. For Jerricho, he did such a great job of knowing where to sit in the zone, and then breaking the tackle down the sideline, making the right cut, hurdling the defender on the sideline (on his 58-yard reception at New England). He looked like it was a kickoff return or something. It was awesome just to watch him do that. For him to rack up yards like that and make a big push for us when we needed it the most was huge. All last year, all throughout this year, he's been there for me just as a safety valve and made some huge plays for a young quarterback and really bailed me out. He’s done a great job. The last game was perfect for him. He deserved that.

On having the most road playoff wins by any quarterback if the team wins this weekend…
For the record, it's not something I'm thinking about. We're just playing to win every game, and we had to win today and that was this practice. I felt like we had a great start to the week. When it comes to our team, I feel like as soon as Saturday walk-through hits, (you’re in your routine). Friday night you go to bed. You lay out your clothes. You've got your suit ready, your tie. I know exactly what shoes I'm wearing. I tuck my socks right in my shoes. I've got my belt in the other shoe and it's just you're ready. It sounds so cheesy like it's the first day of school and you lay out your stuff, but that's really the way it is. I don't know what other guys do on the team, but they probably have a routine. I know exactly where I'm going to eat on Friday. I know who I'm going to eat with. I know what server is going to be serving me. I know exactly what it's going to be and what time we're leaving. Bus leaves at 2:00. Don't be there at 2:01 unless you're Darrelle (Revis) (laughter). I know Rex is going to say that. I just know what's coming. (Manager, Media Relations) Meghan's (Gilmore) going to send me a text saying, “Hey, you've got a production meeting right when we get to the hotel.” 35 minutes later, I'm going to go to my room, look at my plays and go to the meeting. It just fits. It feels right. I feel like everybody on the team has their own little routine that way, so it works out great.

On if he ever thought he would make it to the AFC Championship game in his first two seasons…
The most important thing is what's at stake. You never know. You dream of going to the Super Bowl every year and winning every game, that's how you come in as a rookie. Once you understand after your first season what it's really like and how much hard work it takes, the dedication and grind of the season just to make it to the AFC Championship game. Then, to feel that last year losing, this year it's like, ‘Man, we have such a great opportunity.’ We wouldn't want to feel like that again. As competitors, and guys who want to win, we've put together the best team possible. We're peaking at the right time, and now it's about not making anything up. Not changing what you do. Just being yourself, having fun with the preparation, but being serious and taking advantage of this opportunity, understanding what's at stake and trying to win this game.

On what Rex Ryan has taught him about leadership…
Definitely not to hold anything back and to be yourself. I don't know how many times he's told me that. Even in the toughest situations, he's always told me he's never wavered in his confidence. It's taught me to never waver. You've got to trust yourself. When all else fails, get back to basics, go with what you know and trust your instincts. He'll always tell me in the toughest situations, be yourself, be the guy we drafted. He tells the story (about) when we went out to dinner with Mr. (Woody) Johnson, Mike Tannenbaum, Rex, Schotty (Brian Schottenheimer) and Cav (Matt Cavanaugh). We were walking out of the restaurant and my car's on the far side of the restaurant and they're walking to their car. Right next to their car is a motorcycle. I said, ‘All right, I'll see you guys later,’ and I took the helmet off the motorcycle and was ready to get on the motorcycle. (I was) just messing around. I felt that comfortable with them. At the time, it was just fun. I remember after the Atlanta game last year Rex brought that up and said, “Be that guy. Be the guy that got on the motorcycle, just be him.” And he's right. He's taught me so much about playing in this league and being a tough competitor and a fighter. It’s fun to play for him and you learn a lot from him.

On what winning games against Tom Brady and Peyton Manning does for his confidence…
It's the same thing (as) the question about the record. That kind of stuff is maybe something you'll tell your grandkids about. We were playing against a great quarterback. For now, these wins are for us. It's for the Jets. Rex and I and everybody on the team, we're all 4‑1 in the playoffs. We all beat the Indianapolis Colts, not just Peyton Manning, and not just Tom Brady, but the Patriots. We all beat them. As a franchise, we beat them. That's a huge accomplishment, but we don't want it to end there. I don't look at it as playing against one quarterback or another.

On what it means to have Dennis Byrd around the team…
It's just fitting for him to be our (honorary) captain. I'm proud that he is. I wouldn't want it any other way. Hearing about his story for the first time really makes you understand how fortunate we are and how fragile your career is. These moments you have on the plane, hanging around in the locker room, having fun with guys, going to eat, playing on the field, it's pretty special. It can end at any moment. That was just a good reminder for us of how fortunate we are. His story definitely gave us inspiration last week, and it's just fitting that he's going to lead us out before the game.

WR Santonio Holmes

On his emotions when he found out the Steelers traded him to the Jets…
The main thing that went through my mind was what caused this to happen? I really didn't ask any questions when it happened. I just accepted what was going on. I got a phone call from Coach (Rex) Ryan about five minutes after I got off the phone with the GM of the Steelers (Kevin Colbert), and I called my agent and told him I've been traded. (I’m) pretty sure he probably knew before I did. I got a phone call from Coach Ryan and he talked to me and said, “Welcome aboard.” I told him I'd see him tomorrow when I get in.

On if he feels the Steelers gave up on him unfairly…
I don't know. I had to learn the aspect of the game and the business aspect of this game, which (allows) things like this to happen. I was very happy to get a second opportunity to play football and not really be concerned about what was going on. I had talked to Hines Ward prior to that happening. These type of things happen to big-time players. All you can do is just keep replenishing your career. If you get an opportunity to move somewhere else, don't give up on yourself because someone else did. That’s exactly what I didn't do.

On if this game is personal for him…
I think the personal game is out of the way. The personal game was (Week 15) when we played the Steelers. We got that game out of the way. I got a chance to beat those guys the first time around. This time it means everything, everything for myself, for this team, for this organization. We're trying to get to the Super Bowl. I don't care about the Steelers right now. Those guys are in my team's way, which is the New York Jets. We have one goal, which is to beat those guys, and everything personal that happened (will be reflected) two or three weeks after. If we win the Super Bowl, then everything is personal. That's a slap back in those guys’ face for trading me. Right now, it's not even a focus of mine, and it shouldn't be the focus of any one of my teammates or anyone in this organization.

On Mark Sanchez’s leadership…
He wants to be perfect every time. I think it's our duty as receivers to let him know that mistakes are going to happen during the course of the game, but we need you to keep your cool because we're going to ride with you no matter what. If you throw four interceptions, we still have to play until the end of the fourth quarter and if you want to continue to throw interceptions, that's fine. But, if you want to give the play makers the ball and let those guys play and have fun, then do so because we're going to have your back no matter what. I think he takes that approach now that he understands that he has three playmakers as receivers. He's got two good running backs. I wouldn't even say good, I'm going to use the word great running backs. In my eyes, these guys are great. He has time to give his playmakers the ball and let them do what they need to do.

On the nickname “Flight Boys”…
The Flight Boys is just myself, Braylon (Edwards) and Jerricho (Cotchery). We won't forget the other guy (Brad Smith). We'll talk about him, (number) 16. But for ourselves, it was just something that we wanted to prove to ourselves that we can be a great group of receivers. We've got a guy that's been around this team for seven years in Jerricho, Braylon, who is a six‑year vet and a Pro Bowler, and myself who is a Super Bowl winner. We have play makers. We wanted to build something among ourselves so that neither one of us felt like we're being left out. To say that we have Brad, who is our secret service guy, we don't talk about him very much, because he does his dirty work elsewhere. He knows he's a part of our group at all times.

On how tough it is to play against Troy Polamalu...
With all due respect, I honestly think Troy Polamalu is probably the greatest player I've ever played with or ever seen play in person. Everybody has their one person they think is the greatest player. In my eyes, I think he's the greatest player I've ever played with. The things that he did in my four years of being there, prior to me getting there, was just disrupt a team. He's jumping over the line of scrimmage at the snap of the ball. He's tackling running backs in the backfield. He's jumping up, intercepting balls one- handed. He's returning it for touchdowns. He's done a numerous amount of things. Having him keyed in and keeping the ball away from him, playing sound football and not turning it over and giving him any opportunities to make those type of plays can definitely keep him from disrupting our team.

On what is different about Rex Ryan…
He's a lot of fun. The way he speaks to us is in the mentality of a player. I think every one of the guys in here feels that (way). We respect everything that Coach Ryan talks about and the way that he carries himself. We keep everything that we do here, the way that he talks. You guys see it, you guys hear it. He talks to us the same way. He has fun with us on the football field at all times, but he's definitely about business. When he can allow us, as a group, to just go out and have fun, we repay him by playing well.

On winning playoff games on the road…
Did we turn the ball over versus the Colts? Did we turn the ball over versus the Patriots? That is the key. That is the key to winning any ballgame on the road. Not giving those guys opportunities. Running a four‑minute offense with four minutes on the clock left to end the game and not turn the ball over. Not giving those guys opportunities to have their core guys on the football field that can make plays. If we (keep them) off the field this time around, same result. Same result is a victory.

CB Darrelle Revis

On having to go through Pittsburgh to reach the Super Bowl…
It means a lot to me. Jason Taylor is from there too. We talk about it all the time. We played them a couple of weeks ago. We were talking about just getting a win from where we're from, and in front of our families and close friends. It's the same situation. It is the AFC Championship game, but also it's more personal to me and Jason Taylor.

On the last time he felt he was burned on a play while being completely healthy…
I've been healthy. I can't remember. I've been healthy. Making plays, that's part of my game.

On the last time he was burned for a big play…
I don't, what she said (get burnt) (laughing).

On how his hometown of Aliquippa shaped him…
It's a tough town. It makes you grow up fast. There's a lot of negativity there. The one thing I did growing up is lean (on) the people doing positive things: Ty Law (and) my uncle, Sean Gilbert. Mike Ditka's from there. (I remember) just seeing billboards of him from our hometown and wanting to make it out of there.

On whether all the defensive backs have to have the attitude that they will shut their man down…
I think everybody needs to. I think that's what made our secondary successful in the playoffs is everybody is stepping their level of play up. It don't matter who we're watching (or) who I have to watch. We played the Patriots last game and if my job was to follow Danny Woodhead everywhere, I would, but we've got certain jobs each week. If I'm supposed to be on Hines Ward the whole game, that's my job. If (it is) somebody else, Cromartie is supposed to be on Wallace or Sanders, then that's his job, as well.

On how long it took him to feel right after missing training camp…
Coming into the season, we all knew it was going to be a setback. The coaches knew, Mike Tannenbaum and those guys knew because I hadn’t been in football mode. I was trying to work out as much as I can and do what I needed to do to prepare myself, but it's totally different when you're not in training camp. My personal goals, they are set high. (I) didn't reach a lot of them this year, but one of those goals is where we're at right now, getting to this place we're at, winning this game and going to the Super Bowl. I think that's just a team goal as well for us, just getting here. Everybody's mindset is just getting to the Super Bowl and winning.

On how the challenge of Ben Roethlisberger is different from the challenge of Tom Brady…
It's very tough. We all know in here that Ben can extend plays. The plays can last for 10 to 15 seconds. He's good with his feet. He can scramble. When we played him the first time, the coaching staff just said, “Make sure we plaster those guys. Make sure when the plays are extended, just find your guy and plaster him and get on him as tight as you can, because Ben extends plays very well.”

On the difference between the Pittsburgh and New England offenses…
The Patriots offense is totally different from (Pittsburgh’s). Like you said, it's rhythm and timing with Tom Brady and those guys. He's not a scrambler. He's a pocket passer. He relies on time. He relies on time to throw the ball to Wes Welker and those guys. Ben, he can stand in the pocket if you give him time, he’ll make plays, but also, he can extend plays if the rush is getting there. He can run and scramble with his feet or he can scramble and throw the ball deep.

On what makes it difficult to play at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh…
The playing surface is very tough to play on, but it's just the environment. It's hallowed ground there. Three Rivers (Stadium) was built there. It's just hallowed ground. They play great football. The fans are great. They're football fans. It's a blue-collar city and they love their football. Their fans are like the 12th man. They're ready to go and they're rowdy and that's what makes it tough for teams to win there, because they play great football as well.

On what “plastering” is and how difficult it is to do…
Plastering is, basically, just latching on to your guy. If you're playing against a quarterback like Ben (Roethlisberger), just latch on to (the receiver) as tight as you can when the play extends. A receiver might run a curl route or a slant, but his next read, if he sees Ben scrambling, then he'll break it off and run vertical or maybe turn around and run to the sideline to get a catch on the sideline.

On where latching on to a receiver is difficult to do…
It's hard for secondaries to do that. We've been practicing it all week and we're going to continue to. It's very tough. You have to make sure you have good eyes and locate your receiver when he's going off his route.

On whether Pittsburgh receivers have set routes they run after Roethlisberger scrambles…
With an offense like that, usually they have set plays. They're set plays and they have rules and routes. Like I said before, they might run a slant, but if Ben breaks out to the side, then they might have a rule to get to the sideline or one guy might go to the sideline, and the next guy might go deep. There are rules in their offense that they use.

On whether he can get an idea of what they like to do when the play breaks down by studying the film…
Most of it is just reacting. Usually, you just study the film and see what routes and combinations they're trying to run. Then after that, you can I.D. Ben when he's scrambling, then you get back on your receiver and just aqtry to cover him. It's basically reaction.

Tags: mark sanchez, rex ryan, darrelle revis, santonio holmes

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